Atheism and luck

Atheism and luck is an installation of plastic carpets that have been shown alternatively as a floor piece, a wall hanging, a support for the works of other artists, as well as being used as a space to perform on, meditate or listening to music. Here a new element is introduced, a modest chandelier laden with good luck charms: Italian horns, hand symbols and Turkish and Chinese charms. The work is a speculative space of uncertainty where not-knowing and the anticipation of future opportunities are ironically blended.

“More recent technologies like Youtube and file sharing have enabled us to keep things either accidentally or without knowledge or concern for it’s value. Pieces of silence, static, mistakes are made material and shared alongside utterances that may have been too trivial to consider keeping for anything.”- ACW
“Even as he (Freud) strived for psychoanalysis to attain a certain level of respectability, Sigmund Freud was struggling against his attraction to telepathy. Ernest Jones, his collaborator in London, warned him against this occult practice, as it could bring harm to psychoanalysis. To this Freud replied that his belief in telepathy, just as his taste for tobacco and his Jewishness, remained strictly personal business. As if the personal affairs of Freud had no relationship to psychoanalysis. Telepathy would help make immediate contact with the other without passing through language. Language being nevertheless the condition of analytic treatment and the guarantee of an intersubjective relationship, Freud took the risk of both contradicting himself and imagining a state of telepathic fusion between the subjects. It’s a situation where the Other (including the Other in its absolute difference: the animal), could stop being an other and become a self. Both paradoxes have in common that they reveal conflicting relationships between theoretical constructs and the repressed desires that are impeding them. They also highlight the constraints that oppose the need to recognise difference.”- Sébastien Pluot